Saturday, April 6, 2019

Sample Business Letter Referring a Customer Elsewhere for Information

how to write letter to referring a customer elsewhere for information
referring a customer elsewhere for information

Sample business letter referring a customer elsewhere for information is a sample that goes as far as it can in offering the customer advice and information, and then refer him on to more direct sources of information. The detailed response and friendly tone are aimed at giving the customer the feeling he is always welcome to ask for advice.

Dear.....,

Thank you very much for your letter of January 15 regarding institute programs for business executives.

Longan Institute's program, "Managing Organizational Effectiveness," is the only summer program we know of specializing in personnel management. Many other Institute also has programs in human resources management, but they did not offer summer programs.


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Enclosed is information on all four programs, so you can write to the schools directly for more up to date information.

We hope this will be of help to you and wish you every success in your career development plans.

Sincerely,
Your name


Sample Business Letter When Retailer Complains Price Increases Are Too High

how to write letter when retailer complains prices
Retailer complaint price

Sample business letter when retailer complaints price increases are too high is a sample that shows appreciation for the customer's letter. Explains the reasons for price increases as one business person to another, leading the client to the agreement, Should be written and signed by an officer of the company.


Dear.....,

Thank you for taking the time to tell me your feelings about our prices. Perhaps these figures will help explain our position. We are paying on the average, 15% more this year for our raw materials. We make every effort to maintain a low overhead. Considering the increasing costs in our materials, overhead, and labor, I feel our prices are fair and competitive for our industry.

More important, however, is what our customers are buying when they buy our products. I can certainly understand your desire to get the best deal possible for your business. Our purchasing agents have the same goal, but what does constitute the best deal?
Our most valuable asset is our good name. We manufacture quality products and we stand behind then. We can't afford to cut prices, not if we are to continue to guarantee you and our other customers the best in quality, dependability, and service. It would destroy our good name as a manufacturer and yours as a merchant.

You have established a fine reputation with your store. Can you afford to carry a line of price goods without knowing they will live up to your customers' expectations?

Sincerely,